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No “Dear John” Letters Here

I recently rescued a box of letters, correspondence between a wife and her GI husband during WWII, from the precarious future at the hands of a flea market peddler. Two of their letters are presented here. Frances always began her letters to Melvin the same way – “My Darling Husband.” Melvin’s favorite salutation to Frances […]

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Choo Choo Goes Boom Boom

The pairing these two pieces of ephemera, a slightly salacious men’s magazine and a U.S. Postal Service First Day Cover (FDC), may be confusing – they’re as opposite as the two tips of a compass needle. But in our case, they’re pointing in the same direction: a story of World War II heroics. This issue […]

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The Incredible Mr. Omir

  I don’t know if John Omir ever saw this poster, but if he had, his broad smile and inflated chest would hint that he knew something about its message. Patriotic broadsheets like this one from World War Two, were posted throughout British shipyards. They served as a reminder to the workers that they too […]

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Bucharest to Brooklyn

This Romanian postcard is a visual metaphor for post-World War Two Europe. Especially for the newly formed Communist block countries, of which Romania was one. Understanding the complexities of the geopolitical world is simplified by the sixteen rubber stamps that were pounded on the face of the card, each almost intentionally trying to obscure the […]

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Google Glass – Back to the Future

  Sometimes when technology meets fashion, the results can be awkward. Google Glass, Google’s foray into the consumer optical head mounted display market, is worn like a pair of glasses, making the wearer look like the offspring of Robo Cop and a spinster librarian. Which isn’t a bad thing, especially when compared to Tele-Eyeglasses. The […]

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This post is Classified

One of my more enjoyable pastimes is fingering through old magazines or newspapers reading the Classified Ads. From the elaborate display ads placed in Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper in the 1890’s to the pulp rags of modern times all advertisements have similarities.  But like most things, ads bear the patina of the times that they were […]

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Little Boy, Fat Man and Mr. Lucky

  “Little Boy” – its name poking fun at its extreme size and weight – descended into history on August 6, 1945. This atomic weapon was the result of the most concentrated scientific effort of the first half of the 20th century. It punctuated the American war effort that started in 1941, with the Japanese […]

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The Telegram

This one, written in the normally abrupt syntax of Western Union, is from a daughter concerning her mother. In Dorothy’s message, the first seven words cradle her worry and distress. “MOTHER DID NOT ARRIVE WHERE IS SHE,” typed in caps, without punctuation nor sentiment, by a Western Union operator and hand delivered by a messenger. […]

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